Relationships between monitoring types

The four monitoring types are inter-related:

A programme normally triggers [i.e. consists of] one or more activities
    (an activity is set up for [i.e. contributes to] one or more programmes)

A network contains one or more facilities
    (a facility can belong to one or more networks)

An activity uses one or more facilities [or networks] to collect data
    (a facility [or network] is involved in one or more activities).

Example

The national meteorological monitoring programme is a long term programme designed to monitor weather patterns in the UK.

The programme is composed of several different activities including one to monitor rainfall and another to monitor wind speed.

The rainfall monitoring activity collects data from facilities all over the UK including "Brampton site 1", "Drumburgh site 3" and "Rainfall gauge A7R578".

The wind speed monitoring activity also collects data from facilities all over the UK including "Brampton site 1" and "Penrith site 1".relationships.png

Hierarchical relationships

It is possible to have hierarchical relationships between monitoring records of the same type. For example there may be a record describing a UK programme and then separate records describing component programmes in Scotland, Northern Ireland, England and Wales.

The terms broader than and narrower than are used to describe these hierarchies.

Hierachical relationships

Genealogical relationships

It is possible to have genealogical relationships between monitoring records of the same type. These relationships reflect the situation where, for example, a monitoring facility ceases operation and is replaced by another one.

The terms supersedes and superseded by are used to describe these relationships

supersededFacilities.png

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